Should You Get a 2018 Ford Edge Titanium Now or Wait for the 2019 Model? | review #4

Should You Get a 2018 Ford Edge Titanium Now or Wait for the 2019 Model? | review #4

- Thanks to Red Handed Denial for letting me use their music for the speaker test. You can stream their music here or buy their music here.


The original purpose of an SUV was to use it almost exclusively off-road... yeah, those days are long gone. Now they're primarily used by suburban families and DINKs (Dual Income, No Kids) who have a dog (or two). And there's absolutely nothing wrong with that! Truck enthusiasts will say otherwise. Especially now that the once heroic Jeep has been taken over by stereotypical sorority girls. Nothing wrong with that either! SUVs have gained popularity not because of their off-road ability but because of their unparalleled interior volume and high safety ratings. The 2018 Ford Edge is no different.

When the first generation Edge debuted in 2006 at the Detroit Auto Show, it used Ford's CD3 architecture alongside the original Fusion and Mazda 6. The second-gen Edge now uses CD4 and its assembly line has fortunately stayed in Oakville

The 2018 Edge starts at $32,749 CAD but the test car I drove was the Titanium edition with the 3.5L (214 cubic inch) V6 Duratec engine and all-wheel drive that brought up the sticker price to a cool $50,000. That's a fair bit for a Ford but, to make up for it, it's packed with a quite a few useful features like the lane-keeping system and adaptive cruise control.

Keep in mind that even if you're looking for a used Edge, unless you're on a tight budget, don't get a pre-2016 model because they have the very sluggish Microsoft-based SYNC 2 infotainment system. All of the post-'16s are fitted with the much improved Blackberry QNX-based SYNC 3; including the 2018 I drove and soon coming 2019.

Again, $50,000 is quite a lot but it's actually the second most expensive trim with the Edge Sport (soon changing to Edge ST for 2019) starting at $46,049. Add the metallic red paint and some convenience packages then you'll easily see the price shoot up to a cool $60,000! Whoa. However that's only if you want to get a more driver-centric experience, rather than something that's more suited for a smooth, comfortable experience.

The test car I drove had LED taillamps, body-colour door handles with thin chrome inserts, and chrome tip exhausts. On the inside I found the fairly comfortable meh-quality leather seats to have reasonable lumbar support. The front bucket seats are also 10-way power-adjustable with memory, heating, and cooling options. They will be plenty comfortable for the long haul drives.

If you can't already tell by the look of the exterior, it's not going thrill anyone. Actually, the styling is pretty conservative by modern day standards. The hexagonal grille is also extremely common now and it can be seen on all kinds of vehicles, from hatchbacks like the new A-Class to pickup trucks like the 2019 Ram 1500. I think this is why the designers at Ford decided to put a slightly more unique octagonal grille on the 2019 Edge. Nonetheless, the 2018 Edge is by no means an ugly beast. It's just the kind of car that looks like pretty much every other crossover. For better or worse, it gets absolutely no attention from anyone.

It's the same story on the inside; just grey, silver, and black. Although, with the subtle silver/chrome trims, some might say it gives the car a little class. Unfortunately the quality of the materials isn't the best. The stitching on the steering wheel, door, and seats feel cheap. Same goes for the console buttons but the levers on the steering rack require a surprising amount of effort to activate and feel a little out of place; as if they came straight from the larger and more expensive Expedition. The SYNC 3 touchscreen infotainment system is really responsive and the physical buttons below it are functional and well-placed. The only complaint I have of them is that they're a little too small. The shape of the buttons are also little circles, instead of squares which they should be to not only increase the size more efficiently but give the interior a more robust feeling.

The wheelbase of the Edge is almost identical to that of the Explorer but the model I drove was the 5-seater meaning that it has an even more space for passengers than its bigger brother. In fact, the 5-seater Edge has more interior space than the Nissan Murano and Jeep Grand Cherokee, both of which are about 100mm (3.93 inches) longer than the Edge. That's what I call an efficient package.

While the Edge is based on the same platform that the Fusion uses, the 3.5L V6 that occupies the engine bay can also be found on the Flex, Explorer, and Taurus. It's rated at 209kW (280hp) and 339Nm (250lb-ft) which seems like a lot until you find out that the Edge, with AWD, weighs in at 1840kg (4057lbs). That's about 30kg (66lbs) more than an AWD Nissan Murano and almost 100kg (221lbs) heavier than an AWD Kia Sorento.

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